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Top Techniques Used in Landscape Art

As a landscape artist, you can often easily tell if a landscape has been painted en Plein air or if it wasn’t. There is a clear difference in the light and the scape that is shown in a plein air technique. This is not always seen in work that has been done inside the studio. Several things make a painting that has been done outdoors, different. There is a clear demarcation that it stands out in its lighting and the stark contrast is almost always noticeable.

Use of Direct Sunlight

The type of light that the artist perceives plays an essential part in the transferring of the painting. Even world-renowned artists believe that interior light seems very different from sunlight. The shadows are more pronounced when you are outside than from inside. There is also some haze in the background that can affect how the shadows look and the subject itself. The value of light cannot be measured when it comes to art. Therefore, when artists pay attention to the type of light setting they use for their subject, it can play a more authentic depiction.

Canvas Proportion

The size of the canvas plays an important in the transfer of imagery and imagination. Landscape paintings are perceived by the human eye in a particular proportion. Rather than using a proportion of 5 to 8 using a proportion of 3 to 4 is a better option if you want to stay in line with the eyesight. The kind of clothing you wear when you are painting also helps. Wearing a blue dress will not reflect on the canvas and skew how you visualize your art. The same happens if you wear a black shirt as well because the canvas tends to absorb some of the colour from your clothing and changes how things are perceived.

Analyzing the Painting

Paying attention to all details of the landscape will significantly help the painting in the end. Every small abstract inclusion has a profound effect on art. Unusual compositions used when painting landscape details are what makes the pictures stand out. Looking for the unique mysteries in the landscape is what will make the painting stand out amongst others. People who look at the art at a later time will understand that the little nuances are what makes it unique in its own right. Artists like Clyde Aspevig is a master of using details and always advises on them as well.

Diagonally

The use of diagonals when painting is a skill that painters like Clark Hulings use. The grid helps in travelling of the line of sight without moving away from the focal point of the painting. Winding roads, architecture that is slumped or even hills are great for diagonal incorporation. When the diagonal lines are placed in contrast, it tends to allow the viewer to look around and perceive the painting from all directions. When combined with other aspects and techniques of design, the diagonal lines can genuinely affect and affect the picture to a large and dimensional degree.

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